2B, or not to be: recording the Reliquary System in NieR: Automata

This is the accompanying blog post for the presentation on NieR: Automata that I did all the way back in September in Session 066 at the EAA conference in Barcelona.  The paper was meant as a kind of thought experiment- is it possible to conduct an archaeological desk-based assessment of a video game? The assessment I ended up doing of NieR was incredibly rudimentrary but … Continue reading 2B, or not to be: recording the Reliquary System in NieR: Automata

Archaeogaming as Queergaming

Screenshot from Anna Anthropy’s Queers In Love At The End of The World Introduction Better late than never, as they say! This is the very long-overdue companion blog post to my presentation ‘Archaeogaming as Queergaming’ which I presented in Session 16 ‘Play, Process, and Procedure: An Experiential Digital Archaeology’ at the Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology Conference (CAA) on March 22nd 2018. This … Continue reading Archaeogaming as Queergaming

Archaeogaming Is a Political Matter

This is the companion blog post to my presentation ‘Archaeogaming Is a Political Matter,’ part of the second Public Archaeology Twitter Conference.  My warmest thanks go to Lorna Richardson and James Dixon for organising the conference.  I had a fantastic time taking part. My thanks also to everyone who asked questions and joined in with a discussion about how we define archaeogaming, and who should … Continue reading Archaeogaming Is a Political Matter

Stranger Things Have Happened

On Friday the 27th of October the second season of Stranger Things was released on Netflix. Set almost a year after the events of the last season in 1983, it follows inhabitants in the fictional town of Hawkins dealing with both the aftermath of previous supernatural threats as well as new ones. After marathoning through all nine episodes I felt like writing a quick blog … Continue reading Stranger Things Have Happened